Name

miss independent, yeah

Although the name “Seth” is a boy’s name, the girl herself seems to be comfortable with that. Whenever Ion refers her as “little girl”, she insists that he should call her Seth. Ion curiously asks whether Seth’s parents wanted a baby boy so bad. Seth simply answers that she already has two older brothers, so her “parents” should have had enough sons.

These older brothers, of course, refer to Abel and Cain. Did it ring a bell? Yes, the Nightroad siblings’ names came after the sons of the very first human ever lived on Earth—Adam. Abel and Cain are the first twins born from Adam and Eve, and Seth is one of their younger twin brothers. (I am too lazy talking further about this as there are a lot of versions of the story.) In my humble opinion, the reason Seth is attached to her name in spite of being a female, is probably because the name is the only thing that shows his bond to her beloved brothers—as Krusniks—whom she has not seen for 900 years.

Eventhough Seth has the title “Augusta” for her status, Seth can be seen pretty humble as she doesn’t want to be called that way all the time. It seems that she wants to make a distinct wall between her people and her “friends”. Esther once calls her with honorifics (Miss Seth), Seth tells her: “Just call me Seth. My brothers and my friends call me that.” And when she finally reveals her real identity, Esther calls her Empress, but once again, she smiles and tells her.

“'Seth' is fine. Augusta Vradica is my name in the empire. You’re not my people—you’re a friend. Call me Seth!”

It is mentioned that each of the siblings has their own last name, as a variation of “nightlord”. Abel’s last name is Nightroad, Cain’s is Knightlord, while Seth... well, in various sources it is written as Nightlord, but this onepicture says “Nightload”. While I do think that Nightlord is the more proper name—considering how she is the ruler of an empire where night happens all the time—I don’t think Nightload is wrong either. Afterall, she carries a heavy burden for her status of being an empress.